With 120,000 hours of programming each year, comprising more than 1 billion monthly online video views and 14 free and pay TV channels in 45 million households, German broadcaster ProSiebenSat.1 has significant data requirements. And with ultrahigh-definition (UHD) content becoming more commonplace, this company’s data is increasing at a rate of 100TB per month.

 

The huge task of storing such vast amounts of data was just one problem for ProSiebenSat.1. Silos were another problem. ProSiebenSat.1’s data requirements for its 24-hour scheduled broadcast channel were handled by storage platforms that were completely separate from the data needs of the company’s growing online media presence. ProSiebenSat.1’s data center was physically running out of room for legacy digital tape archives, and it needed to find a new, unified way forward.

 

ProSiebenSat.1 found its answer in NetApp® technology. By investing in NetApp solutions, this broadcasting giant found a way to meet its current needs while also future-proofing its storage system.

 

Developing a Unified Content Platform in the Cloud

By moving to a private cloud storage model, ProSiebenSat.1 migrated its entire 12PB archive into a much smaller footprint on a unified content platform. This model also enabled native data replication to a second site, increasing the resilience of ProSiebenSat.1’s media repository and improving the business continuity profile of the overall enterprise.

 

This move to a private cloud also helps the broadcasting company continue to grow and to innovate. The transition opened a pathway to faster application development for the processing and distribution of content data across the ProSiebenSat.1-owned networks and business partner delivery outlets.

 

Unification of storage and DevOps is a key component that greatly enhances system performance. ProSiebenSat.1 uses the NetApp StorageGRID® object-based storage solution to house the unified content platform, which includes current media content and programming that dates back 20 years. StorageGRID also stores all the application and development code backups from the NetApp SolidFire® DevOps environment. ProSiebenSat.1’s 100 in-house developers are building applications and are hosting them in Kubernetes on the SolidFire all-flash array.

 

Streamlined Workflows

All workflows for the various networks, processing, and distribution to the company’s 100-plus broadcast and social media partners and on-demand video service use StorageGRID as the common content repository source. With this approach, all the business units’ media processing can be supported by a common set of tools. ProSiebenSat.1 is now working with several off-the-shelf applications that support the S3 object protocol, including Cantemo Portal, Vidispine, lnterra Systems BATON, Capella Systems Cambria, and IBM Archive and Essence Manager (AREMA).

 

Get the Full Story

Is your organization struggling with vast amounts of data that’s growing faster than your storage can handle? Are you looking for ways to move forward with DevOps quickly to keep pace with and even surpass the competition? Find out how NetApp can help you become a data visionary. Read the full story and learn why ProSiebenSat.1 selected NetApp technology to help it meet today’s requirements while future-proofing for tomorrow’s demands.

Duncan Moore

Duncan has spent the last 19 years at NetApp working to build solutions to solve customer problems in the areas of: Backup & Recovery, Disaster Recovery, Object Storage and Storage Security. He joined NetApp in 1999 to work on NetApp's first, and still industry leading, replication product SnapMirror and since then has been involved with many other industry firsts including: Unified primary/secondary storage deduplication, near-line storage appliances as well as integrations with leading data protection software vendors.

Duncan’s current focus is in the area of Object Storage, where he leads teams building NetApp’s StorageGRID enterprise object storage system.

Duncan holds a BS in Computer Science from California State University at San Jose as well as an MBA from the University of Kansas. He is based at the NetApp Technology Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.