NetApp IT establishing a devops team with 10 simple rulesEven as a teenager I was fascinated with developing software. My parents called it my obsession. Since I entered the field of software development, the practices have evolved and so I have seen quite a lot of trends come and go. But there is one trend from recent years that has come to stay. And that is DevOps.

 

As defined by Wikipedia, “DevOps is a set of practices that combines software development (Dev) and IT operations (Ops). It aims to shorten the systems development life cycle and provide continuous delivery with high software quality.”

 

At NetApp we started adopting DevOps a few years back, and I can say unequivocally that it works. It has given us significant benefits and has become a trend as more teams adopt the practices. Given its growing popularity, we needed a common approach—specifically, around how DevOps teams should be set up and how they should operate in a combined standard way for both software development and operations. We needed to understand what differentiates a DevOps team from a regular development team and what processes DevOps teams should follow. To answer those questions, we created our own definition of a DevOps team based on the 10 rules shown in the following infographic.

 

For a full explanation of the 10 rules, read the white paper by NetApp IT, DevOps the NetApp Way: Definitions and Best Practices for DevOps. If you have feedback or questions, we would like to hear your thoughts. Email us at ng-CloudOne-DevOps@netapp.com.

 

The NetApp on NetApp blogs feature advice from NetApp IT subject matter experts who share their real experiences in using industry-leading NetApp® data management solutions to support business goals. To learn more, visit www.NetAppIT.com.

Florian Lippisch

Florian Lippisch is the senior manager for Services Enablement Solutions and manages a strong and talented team of technical engineers who develop custom applications to support NetApp’s global business processes. Florian and his team build applications from the ground up—using generic open source frameworks—to implement features that are not readily found in packaged business applications.

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